Double seminar: From physiology to sports injury v/ Michael Kjær

August Krogh Club Double Seminar

14:00-15:00: Abigail Mackey: "Muscle regeneration after heavy loading and muscle injury”
15:00-16:00: Michael Kjær: ”Physiological loading and injury overloading of connective tissue - tendon and cartilage”
16:00-17:00: Post seminar servings and socializing.

Physiological loading and injury overloading of connective tissue - tendon and cartilage

v/ Michael Kjær, Professor of Sports Medicine at Univ of Copenhagen and Head of Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark.

Research profile

Michal Kjaer is an MD specialized in Rheumatology by training and a clinician researcher in physiology by choice. He is a Professor of Sports Medicine at Univ of Copenhagen and Head of Institute of Sports Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, and performs research in skeletal muscle and connective tissue adaptation to exercise in healthy and diseased individuals, with a focus on physiological and pathophysiological tissue adaptation to injury and aging.

Abstract

The overall turnover of the tendon and cartilage in humans seems to be taking place primarily within the first 13-17 years of life, indicating that the basic structure remains relatively unchanged through adult life. Nevertheless, mechanical loading of adult human tendon results in tendon cell responses by producing growth factors and some support for loading-induced increase in tendon collagen synthesis. Comparing tissue turnover in different tissues simultaneously suggests that a combination of a more basic structure that remains relatively unchanged through adult life, and a smaller pool of collagen that is more quickly turned over and can be influenced by mechanical loading. Mechanical loading of adult human tendon results in release of tendon tissue stimulating factors, whereas inactivity down regulates collagen synthesis and phenotypic tendon characteristics. Adjustment of the tendon mechanical properties in the form of increased stiffness and modulus after strength training, and the reverse after period of immobilization occurs relatively fast. Age related changes in tendon connective tissue with reduced stiffness is largely explained by a reduction in overall physical activity and can thus be at least partly counteracted by regular training.

Literature

The impact of loading, unloading, ageing and injury on the human tendon.

Venue

To be announced.

Registration

Participation is free, but please register here.

For PhD students

PhD students participating in August Krogh seminars receive 0,2 ECTS per seminar

Contact

Jonas Møller Kristensen, jmkristensen@nexs.ku.dk 

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