Double seminar: From physiology to sports injury v/ Abigail Mackey

Important note: Venue has been changed to Auditorium B086, Metropol, Sigurdsgade 26, 2200 Copenhagen N


August Krogh Club Double Seminar

14:00-15:00: Abigail Mackey: "Muscle regeneration after heavy loading and muscle injury”
15:00-16:00: Michael Kjær: ”Physiological loading and injury overloading of connective tissue - tendon and cartilage”
16:00-17:00: Post seminar servings and socializing.

Muscle regeneration after heavy loading and muscle injury

v/ Abigail Mackey, Associate Professor, Center for Healthy Aging, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty
of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, and Institute of Sports Medicine Copenhagen,
Bispebjerg Hospital.

Research profile

Abigail Mackey is Associate Professor at Center for Healthy Aging, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, and Institute of Sports Medicine at Bispebjerg Hospital. Her research is centred on the loss and gain of human skeletal muscle in young and elderly individuals through exercise and inactivity interventions, as well as muscle regeneration after strain and experimentally induced injury, with the use of tissue microscopy and primary cell culture to determine the nature of cell-cell interaction and whether pharmacological agents targeting inflammation are of physiological benefit.

Abstract

Skeletal muscle serves fundamental functions, ranging from generating mechanical force to regulating whole-body metabolic homeostasis, all of which decline with age. While muscle injury is usually associated with young adult athletes, injury to older adults represents a threat to maintaining a physically active lifestyle and thereby to a steeper decline in functional capacity. Underpinning skeletal muscle remodelling is the interplay between muscle stem satellite cells, fibroblasts, macrophages, and vascular cells. This interplay is tightly regulated temporally and spatially to orchestrate optimal tissue maintenance, adaptation and damage repair throughout the lifespan. While satellite cells are undoubtedly the most important cell type for muscle regeneration, fibroblasts in particular are emerging as positive regulators of muscle regeneration, by stimulating myogenic cell fusion, although how this interaction might change with age is currently unknown. The focus of this presentation will be on the regeneration of young and old human skeletal, with particular focus on the activity of satellite cells, macrophages and fibroblasts in relation to regenerating muscle fibres as well as their interactions in vitro.

Literature

The breaking and making of healthy adult human skeletal muscle in vivo.

Human skeletal muscle fibroblasts stimulate in vitro myogenesis and in vivo muscle regeneration.

Venue

Auditorium B086, Metropol, Sigurdsgade 26, 2200 Copenhagen N

Registration

Participation is free, but please register here.

For PhD students

PhD students participating in August Krogh seminars receive 0,2 ECTS per seminar

Contact

Jonas Møller Kristensen, jmkristensen@nexs.ku.dk 

Upcoming seminars

Link to other upcoming seminars.