August Krogh Seminar

Importent change - Only one speaker

15:00-16:00: Professor Greg Monteith seminar and discussion
16:00-16:30: Reception and socializing

Calcium channels and pumps in lactation and as drug targets in breast cancer

v/ Prof. Greg Monteith, School of Pharmacy and Mater Research (Translational Research Institute) at The University of Queensland, Australia

Abstract

Calcium signaling is essential to many cellular processes including those associated with cancer progression such as proliferation and invasiveness. The transfer of calcium from the maternal blood supply into milk for offspring nutrition is a fundamental process that is required for the survival of mammals in the early stages of life.

Recently, specific calcium channels and pumps likely to be involved in the transport of calcium ions during lactation have been identified. Elevated levels of these same calcium channels and pumps are a feature of some breast cancers and can often be related to specific breast cancer molecular subtypes.

Calcium permeable ion channels not involved in lactation may also be important in specific aspects of breast cancer progression via increased copy number and promotion of cellular proliferation or through involvement in specific events important in breast cancer metastasis such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

Relevant papers

Targeting EMT in cancer: opportunities for pharmacological intervention. Davis FM, Stewart TA, Thompson EW, Monteith GR. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2014 Sep;35(9):479-88.

Calcium channels and pumps in cancer: changes and consequences. Monteith GR, Davis FM, Roberts-Thomson SJ. J Biol Chem. 2012 Sep 14;287(38):31666-73.

Research profile

Professor Monteith studies cellular signalling in disease and the identification of new drug targets.

Following his PhD at the University of Sydney, Greg spent two years at the University of Maryland at Baltimore (USA) in the Department of Physiology, developing novel techniques for the assessment of calcium (Ca2+) in sub-cellular organelles.

Since his appointment at the University of Queensland, Greg has established a research program with research funding via NHMRC and National Heart Foundation, Queensland Cancer Fund, Society of biomolecular Screening (USA) and other grants and collaboration with Pharmaceutical companies. His interests are signal transduction in disease, calcium transporters as drug targets and biomolecular screening. In 2006 he recieved a UQ Foundation research excellence award.

Time

28 April 2016

15:00-16:00: Professor Greg Monteith seminar and discussion
16:00-16:30: Reception and socializing

Venue

Auditorium 1, August Krogh Building, Universitetsparken 13, DK-2100 Copenhagen

Registration

Participation is free, but please register here.

For PhD students

PhD students participating in August Krogh seminars receive 0,2 ECTS per seminar

Contact

Christian Frøsig, CFrosig@nexs.ku.dk, mobile +45 2875 1617

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