August Krogh / CWS Seminar

Double seminar

14:00-15:00: Professor Sergio Grinstein seminar and discussion
15:00-16:00: Professor Amira Klip seminar and discussion
16:00-16:30: Reception and socializing

Muscle cell chemoattraction of monocytes: effect of lipids and muscle contraction

v/ Amira Klip, Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, and Professor of Paediatrics, Biochemistry and Physiology, The University of Toronto, Canada

Abstract

During exercise, muscle tissue gains macrophages originating from circulating monocytes, which help with tissue repair. These monocytes develop an anti-inflammatory phenotype. In contrast, during obesity, muscle tissue also gain macrophages but in this case they develop a pro-inflammatory phenotype. Using a reductionist system of cells in culture, we found that electrically-stimulated skeletal myotubes chemoattract monocytes, through the release of CCL2.

Conversely, myotubes treated with saturated fatty acids release nucleotides that act as the chemoatracting signal, and such myotubes confer a pro-inflammatory phenotype to macrophages. In vivo, monocytes must cross the microavscular endothelial barrier to reach the muscle fibers, and saturated fats cause increased adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across a microvascular endothelial cell monolayer. The microvasculature is also the barrier regulating insulin transfer from blood to muscle, and fatty acid treatment of microvascular endothelial  cells reduces insulin transcytosis.

Relevant papers

Research profile

Dr. Amira Klip is a senior scientist in the Cell Biology Program at the SickKids Research Institute and Professor of Paediatrics, Biochemistry, and Physiology at the University of Toronto. In order to understand the process of insulin resistance, Dr. Klip studies insulin action and the cellular and molecular steps involved in this process. The work reveals a crosstalk between muscle and immune cells that contributes to insulin resistance.

Dr. Klip's lab has also established cellular platforms to investigate muscle contraction. She directs a laboratory of eight graduate students/postdoctoral fellows, one technician, and one research associate and has generated cell lines that are used by pharmaceutical companies to screen and identify potential anti-diabetic drugs.

Time

19 November 2015

14:00-15:00: Professor Sergio Grinstein seminar and discussion
15:00-16:00: Professor Amira Klip seminar and discussion
16:00-16:30: Reception and socializing

Venue

Auditorium 1, August Krogh Building, Universitetsparken 13, DK-2100 Copenhagen

Registration

Participation is free, but please register here.

For PhD students

PhD students participating in August Krogh seminars receive 0,2 ECTS per seminar

Contact

Christian Frøsig, CFrosig@nexs.ku.dk, mobile +45 2875 1617

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